Favorite Quotes From the Global Leadership Summit

Our favorite leadership development event is the Willow Creek Association’s Global Leadership Summit. This year’s Summit was the 20th event, and our fourth in a row (see my posts on the 2011 and 2013 Summits).

Here are some of my favorite quotes/thoughts from this year’s Summit …

Bill Hybels
Hybels is the leader who challenges me most!

  • What God treasures more than anything in this world is people … even more than visions!
  • Don’t make your people pay because you’re so fired up about the vision.
  • Your culture will only be as healthy as the senior leader wants it to be.
  • People join organizations. They leave managers.
  • Legacy leaders leave something beautiful behind them. Are you a hireling or an owner of the vision?
  • Leaders have a legacy mindset to build something of enduring value … not for personal ambition or personal gain.
  • Legacy leaders run on a higher-quality fuel source.
  • The grander the vision, the higher the price tag (e.g., God’s redemption plan and the sacrifice of Jesus).
  • Legacy leaders are the only ones wiling to pay the price to fix a broken culture.
  • Build in solitude breaks. It’s hard to hear God at Mach 2.

Jeff Immelt
I didn’t take a lot of notes during Hybels’ interview of Jeff Immelt (CEO of GE), but I could have listened to these two leaders talk ALL DAY! One note I made was a statement on career advice: “Be around a crisis at an early age (hopefully, you didn’t cause it) … We don’t know anything about you when the sun is up.”

Patrick Lencioni
Outside of Bill Hybels, Lencioni has spoken at more Summits than anyone else. This year was his third year in a row. I always enjoy listening to Lencioni, and this year’s talk was extremely valuable!

Lencioni talked about the three most dangerous mistakes leaders make …
1. Becoming a leader for the wrong reason.
2. Failure to embrace vulnerability.
3. Making leadership too important.

  • The common trait of these mistakes: PRIDE.
  • If we’re doing it for ourselves we’re going to leave a trail of tears behind.
  • I get tired of hearing about servant leadership … because there isn’t any other kind.

Joseph Grenny
This was Grenny’s second Summit in a row. He talks about “crucial conversations.”

  • Crucial conversations are marked by high stakes, opposing opinions, and strong emotions.
  • Myth: You have to choose between telling the truth and keeping a friend.
  • If you don’t talk it out, you will act it out.
  • Three crucial moments in churches: 1) Performance problems with volunteer staff; 2) Members who are struggling in sin or disconnecting from church; and 3) Concerns with pastors.
  • Crucial conversations are a pit or a path.
  • Two tasks in a crucial conversation: 1) let them know you care about their goals, 2) let them know you care about them.

Ivan Satyavrata
Satyavrata is an Assemblies of God pastor from India.

  • Leaders manage power.
  • Every leader has people power. How are you using it? To manipulate or to add value?
  • Lord, make us leaders who are courageously powerful and genuinely vulnerable, marked by fierce resolve and humility.

Tyler Perry
Perry was interviewed by Bill Hybels. It was a fascinating interview with a Christ-follower, who is a creative leader in the entertainment industry.

  • Remember who you were before you became who you are.
  • I use laughter as the anesthesia to get to the real, deep issues.
  • On critics: God has prepared a table before me in the presence of my enemies. So watch me eat!

Louie Giglio
I always love listening to Giglio!

  • We’re not going up any mountain unless we believe that life is brief.
  • Life is short. But God is big! Life is short. But God can do anything!
  • The only way to the top of the mountain is to take the next step!
  • You don’t have to know everything about the mountain in front of you to take the next step.
  • The stakes are too high for us to die with a small vision.
  • We rest because what we do depends on God, not on us!
  • Humility is what makes great leaders.
  • Humility is not a character trait we develop, it’s a byproduct of spending time with Jesus.

The two-day event was very impacting. These are just some of the thoughts that impacted me!

“Replenish”

Two years ago, I started reading Replenish by Lance Witt. I chose the book because of my experiences with stress (see Hitting the Wall, which includes links to other parts of the story). The Leadership Team at Centre Grove also spent several months reading and discussing the book.

There’s a lot of helpful content in the fairly short book. The book is divided into 41 short chapters. It’s impossible to cover it all, but here are some of my favorite highlights.

Witt cautions about the idolization of leadership that has taken place over the last few decades. He warns, “All of the training and focus on leadership has been a gift, but we must not turn it into an idol.”

One of my favorite quotes from the book states …

We have neglected the fact that a pastor’s greatest leadership tool is a healthy soul.

Witt says, “When leaders neglect their interior life, they run the risk of prostituting the sacred gift of leadership.”

Ministry is a character profession. I can’t separate my private life from my public leadership.

It’s important that leaders are spiritually healthy!

… the Great Commission will not be fulfilled by human ingenuity or innovative thinking alone. This God-sized task will only be completed by Spirit-filled, spiritually healthy churches. And these churches will not be spiritually healthy unless their leaders are spiritually healthy.

Witt’s language about the “front-stage life” and the “back-stage life” of leaders is helpful. Witt says, “We all have a front-stage life and a back-stage life.” The front stage is about “doing” and the back stage is about “being,” and the two are connected. “If we neglect the back stage, eventually the front stage will fall apart.”

Leaders must stay connected to God. “When you have disconnected from the Vine (Jesus), ministry will become joyless striving and stressful pushing.”

Unfortunately, leaders can often become too focused on “image management.” Witt states, “You are walking in a ministry minefield when your outward success begins to outpace your inward life.” A healthy soul helps guard against preoccupation with image management.

Witt writes about the danger of ambition. God-given ambition is good. “But when it is hijacked by self and ego, it can leave a wake of destruction in its path.”

When approval is the driving force in your life, it messes with your motives. You run decisions through the filter of ‘What will people think?’ rather than ‘What’s the right thing to do?’

One of the things that prevents many of us from being healthy spiritually is the pace in which we live. Witt writes about the “need for speed,” and contends, “Hurry is a devious soul enemy.”

Many of us live with a stuck accelerator. The frantic pace of life resides in the church as much as in the community. … We keep the pedal to the metal, trying to grab every possible opportunity. Adrenaline is our hormone of choice.

But Witt argues, “Following Jesus cannot be done at a sprint. You can’t live life at warp speed without warping your soul,” noting that “busyness will damage your soul.”

Intimacy with God is critical for leaders. Witt states, “there’s a correlation between my communion with God and my courage for God. The deeper my intimacy, the greater my tenacity to stand courageously.” He notes, “Solitude creates capacity for God.”

The final section of Witt’s book is on healthy teams.

If you want to talk about an organization’s true spiritual health, you have to look at the health of the team that leads it.

Witt believes, “A healthy staff culture does not happen by accident. You won’t drift into it any more than you would drift into a healthy marriage.” Teams must become a family. “In order for your team to be healthy, there must be a sense of family. You must learn to laugh together, cry together, and resolve conflict together.”

This book has been helpful for me. If you’re interested in similar books, see my posts on Secrets From the Treadmill by Pete Briscoe and Patricia Hickman and Leading on Empty by Wayne Cordeiro.

Your Energy Level Matters

I’ve always been a fairly high-energy person.

But in the last couple of years, my energy level has suffered, ever since my “wake-up call” (elevated heart rate over the course of several months). I wrote a little about it in 3 Steps I’m Taking to Manage Stress Better. While I’m mostly recovered from that experience, my energy levels are still recovering!

Where I notice it the most is with energy-intensive tasks that require heavy thinking, reflection, and intense study, which makes weekly sermon prep more challenging!

Tony Schwartz, who leads The Energy Project, writes in Fatigue is Your Enemy

it’s not the number of hours we work that determines the value we create. Rather, it’s the quality of energy we bring to the hours we work. By renewing regularly, it’s possible to get more done, in less time, at a higher level of quality, more sustainably. When we’re less fatigued, we’re not only less prey to negative emotions, we’re also more likely to access the positive ones we need to feel to perform at our best.

So, managing your energy level is vitally important. In stewardship language, we must be good stewards of our energy level.

Here’s how I’m trying to manage my energy level …

1. Make the most of my early morning routine.
I find that if I get up early to spend time with God, exercise, and read, the rest of my day is much more productive and enjoyable. My energy level is higher. This has always been important for me; it’s even more important with kids!

2. Eat well.
I’ve always been interested in healthy nutrition, but my discipline doesn’t always match my desire. Still, over the past two years, I’ve dramatically reduced my intake of sugar (it effects my heart rate), which cuts out most junk food. What you eat can affect your energy level.

3. Rest.
Stopping to rest a little everyday, sometime during the day, will always be a challenge for me. Between work and family obligations, there always seems to be something going on. But, I know I need to carve out time each day, and a day each week, to rest and catch my breath.

4. Hydrate.
Lately, I’ve been drinking more water. CamelBak has a lot of good info on hydration. They say a “recent study found that almost half of men and women are not drinking enough water.” Their ten facts about hydration include: hydration keeps your heart rate lower, longer, and dehydration is the number one cause for afternoon fatigue. Another article states, “drinking water helps keep … your energy levels and focus maximized.”

5. Do high-energy tasks when my energy is highest.
Unfortunately, I don’t always do this well. But, I know I should work on energy-intensive tasks when my energy levels are highest. My energy levels are highest in the mornings, so I should work on sermons and other high energy tasks in the mornings. And, I should use the afternoons for things that don’t require as much energy.

How’s your energy level? What do you to do improve your energy?

If this is something you’re struggling with, you may be interested in my review of “Leading on Empty” by Wayne Cordeiro.

Managing Chaos With Online Calendars

With the adoption of Ethan in 2008, Joleen and I went from being a clergy couple to being a clergy couple with a child. In other words, the chaos only increased!

Shortly after bringing Ethan home from Korea, we set up online calendars using Google Calendar. The benefit is that either of us can access our shared calendars anytime so we don’t overbook days/times. And, with mobile technology, we have access to our calendars anywhere with a mobile device.

We have set up multiple calendars (each with their own color) that all appear on one calendar. At the moment, we have Randy’s Work, Joleen’s Work, Our Work, Family, School, and Special Days.

For time management, especially family time management and communication, this is the best thing we have done. We use our calendars to schedule appointments, activities, and remind us about special days.

Time management expert Laura Stack suggests calendaring everything …

I’m not sure if we calendar everything, but one area most people, including us, need to improve is learning to prioritize what goes on the schedule and what doesn’t. Some people, such as Michael Hyatt, suggest having a not-to-do list …

I’ve written a lot about time management over the years, including Task Management, Task Management 2.0, Time Management, Early Methodist View on Use of Time, and a post on the task management app, 2do (I still use the 2do app but the app is long overdue for an update, which the developers have been promising for a long time; I may write a new post on how I use 2do after the update). I’ve written a lot about time management, not because I have a lot to say about it, but because it will always be an area I want to improve!

How do you manage chaos, especially with others (families, teams)?

Leaders Go First

“Leaders go first.” It’s a fairly common phrase. I thought of it the other day as I was reading 1 Chronicles 29.

King David, nearing the end of his life, is preparing the nation for its new king, his son, Solomon. Specifically, David is making preparations for the building of God’s temple. The temple was David’s dream, but God wouldn’t let him complete the project. It would have to wait until Solomon’s reign.

David said to the people …

My son Solomon, the one whom God has chosen, is just an inexperienced young man, and the task is great, for this palace is not for man, but for the Lord God. So I have made every effort to provide what is needed for the temple of my God, including the gold, silver, bronze, iron, wood, as well as a large amount of onyx, settings of antimony and other stones, all kinds of precious stones, and alabaster. (1 Chronicles 29.1-2, NET).

Then, David modeled the kind of investment he would invite others to make. He said …

Now, to show my commitment to the temple of my God, I donate my personal treasure of gold and silver to the temple of my God, in addition to all that I have already supplied for this holy temple. This includes 3,000 talents of gold from Ophir and 7,000 talents of refined silver for overlaying the walls of the buildings, for gold and silver items, and for all the work of the craftsmen. (1 Chronicles 29.3-5)

And, finally, after all that, David challenged the people, “Who else wants to contribute to the Lord today?”

I love that. This is what I’m doing. What are you going to do?

David went first. He set the bar. He modeled for others the kind of commitment and ownership he was looking for. Then, he made the invitation and gave the challenge.

Leaders go first.

Character, Competence, & Chemistry

I’ve been familiar with these terms for a while. These three Cs—Character, Competence, and Chemistry—are critically important for teams, including church ministry teams!

I was reminded of this again lately as I’m reading slowly through Leadership Axioms: Powerful Leadership Proverbs by Bill Hybels. The book includes brief sections on 76 different concepts, including a chapter on these three Cs.

Character
Often, our tendency is to put competence at the top of the list. But character is really the most important element. Andy Stanley says, “Have a ministry; don’t hire one!”

Hybels writes …

You have got to do your due diligence to be sure the person you’re about the invite onto the team has a proven track record of being a truth-teller, a covenant-keeper, a person who seeks to be conformed to the image of Christ, someone who manages relationships well, and one who credits the efforts of others when a victory is won.

Character matters. A lot.

Competence
Competence also matters, of course. It’s the most obvious element of the three Cs. As a leader, you look for “gifts and talents and capabilities that will take your ministry to the next level of effectiveness.”

Chemistry
As Hybels notes, chemistry often gets overlooked. We expect competent people fit in and play well with others. But that’s not always the case.

Hybels confesses …

I learned the hard way to trust my gut on this: if I get negative vibes the first two or three times I’m in someone’s presence, it’s likely I’m not going to enjoy working with that person day in and day out. Sounds crass, I know, but I have learned this painful lesson too many times.

These three Cs are important for all kinds of teams. It’s particularly challenging for (mostly) volunteer teams like the teams found in churches. Sometimes, the primary requirement to be on a team in a volunteer organization is simply willingness. Beyond that, we recognize, to some degree, the value of character and competence. But chemistry—the ability to fit in and play well with others—is the most overlooked.

How do you discern whether a person is a good fit for your team?

“Shaped By God’s Heart”

I recently read Shaped By God’s Heart: The Passion and Practices of Missional Churches by Milfred Minatrea. I should have included this book in my doctoral dissertation (how leaders shape missional culture), but I missed it!

Minatrea’s definition of a missional church is …

a reproducing community of authentic disciples, being equipped as missionaries sent by God, to live and proclaim His Kingdom in their world. (xvi)

The author argues that over the centuries churches developed a “maintenance mentality,” in which “they retreated to the sanctuary, their place of comfort, growing ever more inward in their orientation.” As a result, “They maintained the status quo” (7). Too many churches are now “focused on survival” (7).

The author distinguishes between “mission-minded” and “missional.” Whereas mission-minded churches support missions, for people in missional churches, “missions is more centered in ‘being and doing’ than ‘sending and supporting'” (10-11). Minatrea asserts, “every member is a missionary” (11). “Missions is not perceived as an expression of the missional church, but as the essence of the church.” (11)

Minatrea describes “four dimensions of missional churches”

  • Love God
  • Live his mission
  • Love people
  • Lead them to follow

The book centers around “nine essential practices of missional churches.”

1. Have a high threshold for membership.

Missional churches are high-threshold churches, and they clearly communicate the responsibilities of church membership. (30)

2. Be real, not real religious.

Minatrea notes, “The hunger for authenticity is epidemic today” (43). He contends, “The litmus test of the missional church is how members live when scattered during the week” (48).

3. Teach to obey rather than to know.

Minatrea states, “The goal of biblical instruction in the missional church is obedience, not simply knowledge” (56). “Their goal is members’ obedience to spiritual revelation” (54).

4. Rewrite worship every week.

Rather than simply going through the motions, and doing things the same way week after week, missional churches incorporate these ingredients …

  • God is the focus of worship.
  • Worship is experiential.
  • Worship is about content, not form.
  • Worship is highly participatory.
  • Worship values creativity.
  • Worship is more than words. (66)

5. Live apostolically.

Today, members of missional churches must be bilingual in that they must be able to communicate in terms that can be understood by those without as well as those within the church. (79)

6. Expect to change the world.

I love this. “The point of the kingdom is transformation” (89).

7. Order actions according to purpose.

It’s so easy for churches to fall into ruts, doing things the way they do because that’s how they’ve always been done. “Missional churches do what they do for specific reasons” (101). In fact, everything in missional churches is done on purpose …

  • They know their purpose.
  • They check that actions are based upon purpose.
  • They let go of what does not serve their purpose.
  • They do only what serves their purpose. (102)

Toward the end of the book, the author argues for simple structures. He says missional churches …

seek to create low-investment structures and keep their mission and purpose as their priority. Their structures must be flexible, capable to adapting quickly to the changing opportunities their context brings to the missional purpose. (145)

8. Measure growth by capacity to release, not retain.

For missional churches, the goal of church growth is not to get bigger. The goal is to equip more people to live as authentic disciples of Jesus Christ. The measure has to do with function, not size. Enlargement is a by-product rather than the focus of growth in missional churches. (112)

9. Place kingdom concerns first.

Minatrea notes, “no significant Kingdom accomplishment will occur until churches value Kingdom more than their own sectarian accomplishments” (127).

Wouldn’t it be awesome if all of our churches were growing in these passions and practices?

Cultivating a Movement: Keep Moving Forward!

We’re at the end of our series on Cultivating a Movement (see Surrender, Rely on God’s Power, Pursue Holiness, Scatter Seeds, Preserve Unity, Pray Through, and Be Moved With Compassion).

I’ve been describing a movement as a people God can move through, a church God can use. A dictionary definition of a movement is, “A group of people who share the same goal and work together to achieve it.” That ought to describe the church!

While this series comes to an end, its importance does not. I consider it part of my job description as a pastor to cultivate a movement. And, the church must keep moving forward!

Comfort Zone
We all have a comfort zone, a space where we’re most comfortable, where we feel fairly safe. But we can’t spend our whole lives there, especially not if we’re followers of Jesus!

Jesus followers are risk takers!

I love what Mark Batterson recently tweeted …

When I think of taking risks for God—willingness to go where God leads—I think of Peter’s attempt at getting out of the boat to walk on water with Jesus. It didn’t turn out so well for Peter, but it was certainly a great lesson, and a great story!

When Peter realized, in the middle of a storm, that it was Jesus on the water, and not a ghost, he said, “Lord, if it’s you, order me to come to you on the water” (Matthew 14.28, CEB). Jesus said, “Come.”

It started out pretty well. “Peter got out of the boat and was walking on the water toward Jesus” (Matthew 14.29).

But that’s when reality set in for Peter.

But when Peter saw the strong wind, he became frightened. As he began to sink, he shouted, “Lord, rescue me!” Jesus immediately reached out and grabbed him, saying, “You man of weak faith! Why did you begin to have doubts?” (Matthew 14.30-31)

The focus in the story is on Peter, but I love John Ortberg’s take on the story, which he developed in his book, If You Want to Walk on Water, You’ve Got to Get Out of the Boat (see my post on the book).

Peter risked it all by getting out of the boat, while the other disciples stayed behind where they would, at least, have something to hang onto!

Following Jesus requires total surrender. Oswald Chambers used the phrase, “a reckless abandon to Jesus” to describe total surrender. Jesus followers must live with a reckless abandon to Jesus!

I invite you to pray the prayer we’ve been praying at Centre Grove for a while: Lord, do something unpredictable and uncontrollable!

We will also need to stay humble, stay hungry, and stay in tune with God! All three aspects are essential if we’re to keep moving forward!

Jesus invites us on a great adventure. Total surrender—a reckless abandon to Jesus—is required. Jesus said …

All who want to come after me must say no to themselves, take up their cross, and follow me. All who want to save their lives will lose them. But all who lose their lives because of me and because of the good news will save them. (Mark 8.34-35)

Jesus followers are risk takers!

Cultivating a Movement: Be Moved With Compassion!

We’re nearing the end of my sermon series on Cultivating a Movement (see Surrender, Rely on God’s Power, Pursue Holiness, Scatter Seeds, Preserve Unity, and Pray Through).

There is clearly a great deal of need in the world. And, the only organization in the world that truly has the power to change the world is the Church, the body of Christ!

But why aren’t we seeing more change and transformation in the world?

Here are three possible reasons …

  1. We don’t think we can make a difference. Perhaps we see the needs around us, but we don’t help because we feel inadequate, incapable of doing any good for others.
  2. We don’t know where to start. Maybe we see the needs around us, and though we care, we simply have no idea where to start or what to do.
  3. We don’t care. Perhaps we see the needs around us in the world, but we don’t care enough to get involved.

Well, if we’re going to be a movement, we must be moved with compassion. Compassion compels us to get involved and to make a difference!

I love the places in the gospels where we’re told Jesus was moved with compassion. One of those places is in Mark 6 where Jesus feeds thousands of people with a little bit of food. The story begins, “When Jesus arrived and saw a large crowd, he was moved with compassion because they were like sheep without a shepherd” (Mark 6.34).

Rather than sending people home hungry, Jesus instructed his disciples to give them something to eat. With only five loaves of bread and two fish, Jesus asked the disciples to seat the people for the meal. Jesus gave the food, which he had blessed, to his disciples, to distribute it to the people seated on the ground. Not only did everyone eat, but there was plenty left over!

And, it all started because Jesus was “moved with compassion.”

Jesus once told a story about the Good Samaritan (Luke 10.25-37). In the story, there is a man who’s been robbed and left for dead. After being ignored by a priest and a Levite, a Samaritan (despised in the eyes of Jesus’ listeners) “was moved with compassion” (Luke 10.33). He took care of the wounded man and made arrangements for his recovery. Jesus concluded the story, saying, “Go and do likewise” (Luke 10.37).

I’ve also always loved the order of events found in Matthew 9.35-38. We’re told …

Jesus traveled among all the cities and villages, teaching in their synagogues, announcing the good news of the kingdom, and healing every disease and every sickness. Now when Jesus saw the crowds, he had compassion for them because they were troubled and helpless, like sheep without a shepherd. (Matthew 9.35-36)

Jesus traveled. Jesus saw. Jesus was moved with compassion. Often, we wait to be moved with compassion before we go and see. But if we go and see, we will be moved with compassion!

After seeing the great need, and the great opportunity, Jesus said …

The size of the harvest is bigger than you can imagine, but there are few workers. Therefore, plead with the Lord of the harvest to send out workers for his harvest. (Matthew 9.37-38)

God is looking for people who are moved with compassion to make a difference in the world for the kingdom of God. Compassion compels us to get involved and to make a difference! This is why we pray, “Lord, break our hearts for what breaks yours!”

Andy Stanley offers some great advice. He says, “Do for one what you wish you could do for many.” This is a great way to avoid feeling paralyzed—not knowing where to start—or wondering what kind of difference you can make. Just start somewhere!

Pray “Lord, break our hearts for what breaks yours!” And, then “Do for one what you wish you could do for many!”

Cultivating a Movement: Pray Through!

I’m in the home stretch of a sermon series on Cultivating a Movement (see Surrender, Rely on God’s Power, Pursue Holiness, Scatter Seeds, and Preserve Unity).

Too Busy Not to Pray!
We often live as if we’re too busy to pray. In an effort to get things done, we cut out prayer time. This is a pitfall even for people in ministry. A. W. Tozer said, “In an effort to get the work of the Lord done, we often lose contact with the Lord of the work.”

In reality, we are too busy NOT to pray (see Bill Hybels’ book of the same title)!

And, this is so important for the church, because prayer is the heartbeat of a movement!

In Matthew 6, Jesus teaches his followers about prayer. He says they shouldn’t pray for the purpose of impressing others. Rather, Jesus says …

… when you pray, go to your room, shut the door, and pray to your Father who is present in that secret place. Your Father who sees what you do in secret will reward you. (Matthew 6.6, CEB)

After talking about prayer, Jesus turns his attention to fasting, and instructs his followers …

When you fast, brush your hair and wash your face. Then you won’t look like you are fasting to people, but only to your Father who is present in that secret place. Your Father who sees in secret will reward you. (Matthew 6.17-18).

In both cases, Jesus says God is “present in that secret place.”

In The Circle Maker, Mark Batterson states, “In the grand scheme of God’s story, there is a footnote behind every headline. The footnote is prayer. And if you focus on the footnotes, God will write the headlines.”

Jesus begins his model prayer, “Our Father …” Our prayers are determined by our view of God. Batterson suggests, “The size of our prayers depends on the size of our God. And if God knows no limits, then neither should our prayers.”

Jesus prays, “Bring in your kingdom so that your will is done on earth as it’s done in heaven” (Matthew 6.10), or in the traditional language, “Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. ”

This is a core prayer for a movement. It’s all about God’s kingdom!

Batterson suggests, “The bigger the vision, the harder you’ll have to pray!” God has given the church a mission, a mission that’s bigger than we are. It’s more than we can accomplish on our own. We must rely on God’s power. Prayer is the heartbeat of a movement!

Some practical ways I invited people at Centre Grove to pray through, especially over the next several weeks (at least through Easter), include …

  1. Use the prayer guide for cultivating a movement (we’ve been praying some of these prayers for a while) …
  2. Develop a prayer idiosyncrasy, a prayer practice that’s unique and meaningful for you.
  3. Practice fasting, perhaps the Wesley Fast (described in this post on fasting).

Prayer is so important. Prayer can never be the only thing we do, but it will always be the most important thing we do! R. A. Torrey said, “There have been revivals without much preaching; but there has never been a mighty revival without mighty prayer!”

Prayer is the heartbeat of a movement!